More schools after Browne

Max Browne has seen all kinds of defensive schemes trying to slow down his potent Sammamish (Wash.) Skyline offense but the 2013 pro-style quarterback continues to carve up most opponents and he's having another phenomenal season.
Browne, one of the top junior quarterbacks in the West, has thrown for 2,148 yards with 24 touchdowns and four interceptions through seven games this season. Those numbers are exceptional following a year where he threw for 4,182 yards with 50 TDs and 13 picks.
"Most teams have been trying to drop back, dropping seven or eight on any given down and trusting their front three against our front five," Browne said.
"Teams have tried to blitz a little bit but last year Eastlake brought, five, six, seven guys on each play but most teams have been trying to drop back and forcing me to throw around a bunch of defensive backs.
"It's a different mentality when they blitz but I had my best game against Eastlake last year and they blitzed a bunch. I was 39 of 43 so that was a good game. It doesn't really matter to me. We have enough plays that if they blitz we'll go to this play and if they sit back we'll take our time and let the play develop. It doesn't matter to me."
Browne, a 6-foot-5, 202-pound prospect, is a cerebral quarterback so switching out of plays and comprehending an extensive playbook is no problem for him. He's been doing it at Skyline for years.
Colleges are on the hunt, too.
So far, Cal, Clemson, Colorado, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin have offered him and many other schools are showing interest but the Skyline standout wants to wait until after his junior season to seriously focus on recruiting. The offer from the Buffaloes is his newest one and it came a couple weeks ago.
USC, Stanford, Alabama and many others are showing interest. Browne said after the season he'll start calling more coaches and giving things a closer look. At this point, he's more worried about Eastlake this weekend.
"I'm kind of focused on the season right now and then I'll reach out to the coaches after the season," Browne said. "There is a bunch of mail from a variety of schools from different conferences."